April 19, 2014
April 18, 2014
On April 4, 2006, Kode9 presented a mix of his label’s first major release, Burial’s self-titled first album, on the BBC One radio program Breezeblock, which is hosted by the queen of the dubstep movement, Mary Anne Hobbs.
That numinous moment (consisting of a 21-minute mix) marked for many the birth of a new sound, a new beat, and a new direction in music. In the way that the Communist Manifesto announced that a specter haunted 19th-century Europe (“the specter of communism”), Kode9’s Breezeblockmix announced a specter haunting 21st-century London (the specter of Burial). After the clearing of a crackling cloud of alien transmissions, buzzing telecommunication equipment, and digital dub drones, there emerged the metallic momentum of an underground beat, which, after a few minutes, was faded out and replaced with a call for peace by holographic angels. Then came the wisdom of a jaded hit man (“we got to stick to the old-school ways”), the longings of a heartbroken Rasta (“my love, my love, my love”), and the spectacle of giants rising from the depths of the Thames and marching across the city. The groundbreaking mix presented a postindustrial version of William Blake’s preindustrial 18th-century poem “London” (“Near where the charter’d Thames does flow/And mark in every face I meet/Marks of weakness, marks of woe”).

On April 4, 2006, Kode9 presented a mix of his label’s first major release, Burial’s self-titled first album, on the BBC One radio program Breezeblock, which is hosted by the queen of the dubstep movement, Mary Anne Hobbs.

That numinous moment (consisting of a 21-minute mix) marked for many the birth of a new sound, a new beat, and a new direction in music. In the way that the Communist Manifesto announced that a specter haunted 19th-century Europe (“the specter of communism”), Kode9’s Breezeblockmix announced a specter haunting 21st-century London (the specter of Burial). After the clearing of a crackling cloud of alien transmissions, buzzing telecommunication equipment, and digital dub drones, there emerged the metallic momentum of an underground beat, which, after a few minutes, was faded out and replaced with a call for peace by holographic angels. Then came the wisdom of a jaded hit man (“we got to stick to the old-school ways”), the longings of a heartbroken Rasta (“my love, my love, my love”), and the spectacle of giants rising from the depths of the Thames and marching across the city. The groundbreaking mix presented a postindustrial version of William Blake’s preindustrial 18th-century poem “London” (“Near where the charter’d Thames does flow/And mark in every face I meet/Marks of weakness, marks of woe”).

April 16, 2014
astronomicalwonders:

Doradus Nebula
A panoramic view of a vast, sculpted area of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born has been captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.
The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of the fertile, star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 (the large blue blob left of center), are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that incubate newborn stars.
The 30 Doradus Nebula is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are signposts of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths formed about 2 million years ago.
Credit: NASA/JPL

astronomicalwonders:

Doradus Nebula

A panoramic view of a vast, sculpted area of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born has been captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of the fertile, star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 (the large blue blob left of center), are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that incubate newborn stars.

The 30 Doradus Nebula is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are signposts of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths formed about 2 million years ago.

Credit: NASA/JPL

April 15, 2014
foxship987:

Martian sunset Setting Sun The Mars Rover Spirit took this sublime view of a sunset over the rim of Gusev Crater, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) away. Taken from Husband Hill, it looks much like a sunset on Earth—a reminder that other worlds can seem eerily familiar. Sunset and twilight images help scientists to determine how high into the atmosphere the Martian dust extends and to look for dust or ice clouds. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Texas A&M/Cornell

foxship987:

Martian sunset
Setting Sun
The Mars Rover Spirit took this sublime view of a sunset over the rim of Gusev Crater, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) away. Taken from Husband Hill, it looks much like a sunset on Earth—a reminder that other worlds can seem eerily familiar. Sunset and twilight images help scientists to determine how high into the atmosphere the Martian dust extends and to look for dust or ice clouds.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Texas A&M/Cornell

April 13, 2014
The ape grips the bone. The monolith inspires this gripping of the bone, the tool, the weapon. The word “grip” in English is related to the German word “begriff”—a concept, an idea, the form of a thought. Furthermore, the part of the brain that coordinates grasping and gripping is also the part of the brain that manages gestures, and gestures are the ancestors of vocalized language. There is a connection between gripping and the production of words, gripping and the formation of thought, gripping and the emergence of the state. Indeed, the Greek word for justice, “dike,” is related to the word “digit,” fingers. The law, the truth, the state, the written language, the technologies of power and control—all have their origins in our hands. The moment the ape in 2001 grips the bone is the moment consciousness begins its long journey to outer space.

The ape grips the bone. The monolith inspires this gripping of the bone, the tool, the weapon. The word “grip” in English is related to the German word “begriff”—a concept, an idea, the form of a thought. Furthermore, the part of the brain that coordinates grasping and gripping is also the part of the brain that manages gestures, and gestures are the ancestors of vocalized language. There is a connection between gripping and the production of words, gripping and the formation of thought, gripping and the emergence of the state. Indeed, the Greek word for justice, “dike,” is related to the word “digit,” fingers. The law, the truth, the state, the written language, the technologies of power and control—all have their origins in our hands. The moment the ape in 2001 grips the bone is the moment consciousness begins its long journey to outer space.

April 10, 2014
Burial doesn’t sound like an ordinary person, but like a saint—a saint in a world that is entirely human, a world without a god, a world that is alone in the vast emptiness of space. The nearest star to our sun is four light years away. A world that is aware of this radical loneliness is a world that dances to the mood and music of Saint Burial.

Burial doesn’t sound like an ordinary person, but like a saint—a saint in a world that is entirely human, a world without a god, a world that is alone in the vast emptiness of space. The nearest star to our sun is four light years away. A world that is aware of this radical loneliness is a world that dances to the mood and music of Saint Burial.

April 9, 2014
April 8, 2014
ohstarstuff:

This is an incredible shot of a thunderstorm lighting up the skies over Bolivia as seen from the ISS. At the moment the astronaut snapped the photo, a lightning bolt tore through the cloud, illuminating it from within. It definitely has an eerie apocalyptic feel to it.
(Image credit: NASA; Description credit: Phil Plait, Slate)

ohstarstuff:

This is an incredible shot of a thunderstorm lighting up the skies over Bolivia as seen from the ISS. At the moment the astronaut snapped the photo, a lightning bolt tore through the cloud, illuminating it from within. It definitely has an eerie apocalyptic feel to it.

(Image credit: NASA; Description credit: Phil Plait, Slate)

April 7, 2014

bobbycaputo:

Two Spectacular Photographs of a Volcanic Eruption as Seen from Space by Endeavour

In September and October of 1994, the space shuttle Endeavour was orbiting 115 nautical miles above Earth while the Kliuchevskoi Volcano was spewing ash and dust into the atmosphere at an alarming rate. Not in any position to do anything about it, the astronauts aboard the space shuttle did the only thing they could do… they took pictures.

The two images you see here were taken from the space shuttle and show the global scale of the ash cloud released by Kliuchevskoi. 

(Continue Reading)

April 6, 2014
Amazon: “As the film points out, we are such stuff as the universe is made of. Stars contain the same elements as the bones of those buried in mass graves in the Atacama. The same light that ennobles the best of our intentions (an understanding of who we are as human beings) also reveals cruelty, torture, and murder on a scale that is almost impossible to understand.”

Wikipedia: “Patricio Guzmán’s documentary compares two seemingly different ideas in a way that presents them to be the same endeavor. Guzmán stresses the struggle these Chilean women face as they try to find their loved one’s bodies, and at the same time he points out how astronomers struggle to understand humanity’s origin by looking at the cosmos. Both groups delve into the past in order to create a more solid and concrete understanding of it. The women who search the desert look for the calcium in the form of bones while the astronomers look for calcium as a remnant of stars and the big bang. Slides were shown of asteroids that then transitioned into close-ups of bone fragments. The difference is indistinguishable, and expresses, on a deeper level, that these astronomers and women are on the same journey.”

Me: “Directed by Patricio Guzmán—the man behind the monumental three-part documentary The Battle of Chile—Nostalgia for the Light is a cinematic poem about the history of Chile and the history of the universe. The point where these two histories meet is one of the driest and most cloudless places on earth, the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. The desert is so severe, so unearthly, that it is used to test machines and instruments for planned trips to Mars. Despite the unwelcoming, Mars-like terrain, the desert hosts a community of telescopes that look into the depths of space and time (the history of the universe), and a group of women who search the desert for loved ones who were murdered by the dictator Augusto Pinochet (the history of the country). In the mid-1970s, Pinochet set up a death camp in an abandoned saltpeter mine.
The reason the mine was abandoned can be found in the invention of the Haber-Bosch process, which industrialized the production of nitrogen. The reason the Germans developed this process in the first place is because they did not have access to the saltpeter mines in Chile (they were controlled by the British). One theory has it that the Germans rapidly industrialized nitrogen production for military reasons. But the process that was used for the production of German explosives during the first great European war of the 20th century is also the same process that’s responsible for the fact that seven billion humans live on the world at this time. Without artificial access to nitrogen, there would not be enough of the vital nutrient to sustain this enormous human population.”

Amazon: “As the film points out, we are such stuff as the universe is made of. Stars contain the same elements as the bones of those buried in mass graves in the Atacama. The same light that ennobles the best of our intentions (an understanding of who we are as human beings) also reveals cruelty, torture, and murder on a scale that is almost impossible to understand.”

Wikipedia: “Patricio Guzmán’s documentary compares two seemingly different ideas in a way that presents them to be the same endeavor. Guzmán stresses the struggle these Chilean women face as they try to find their loved one’s bodies, and at the same time he points out how astronomers struggle to understand humanity’s origin by looking at the cosmos. Both groups delve into the past in order to create a more solid and concrete understanding of it. The women who search the desert look for the calcium in the form of bones while the astronomers look for calcium as a remnant of stars and the big bang. Slides were shown of asteroids that then transitioned into close-ups of bone fragments. The difference is indistinguishable, and expresses, on a deeper level, that these astronomers and women are on the same journey.”

Me: “Directed by Patricio Guzmán—the man behind the monumental three-part documentary The Battle of ChileNostalgia for the Light is a cinematic poem about the history of Chile and the history of the universe. The point where these two histories meet is one of the driest and most cloudless places on earth, the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. The desert is so severe, so unearthly, that it is used to test machines and instruments for planned trips to Mars. Despite the unwelcoming, Mars-like terrain, the desert hosts a community of telescopes that look into the depths of space and time (the history of the universe), and a group of women who search the desert for loved ones who were murdered by the dictator Augusto Pinochet (the history of the country). In the mid-1970s, Pinochet set up a death camp in an abandoned saltpeter mine.

The reason the mine was abandoned can be found in the invention of the Haber-Bosch process, which industrialized the production of nitrogen. The reason the Germans developed this process in the first place is because they did not have access to the saltpeter mines in Chile (they were controlled by the British). One theory has it that the Germans rapidly industrialized nitrogen production for military reasons. But the process that was used for the production of German explosives during the first great European war of the 20th century is also the same process that’s responsible for the fact that seven billion humans live on the world at this time. Without artificial access to nitrogen, there would not be enough of the vital nutrient to sustain this enormous human population.”